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Ubiquitous Computing and Privacy
 

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HIPAA

PRIVACYnotes Discussion List
Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

Respecting Privacy on the Web

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PRIVACYnotes Digest Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

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Published by: Mike Banks Valentine PRIVACYnotes

privacy@website101.com www.privacynotes.com
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March 14, 2002 Issue # 001
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.....IN THIS DIGEST.....

// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

"Welcome to PRIVACYnotes!
Moderator Introduction" ~ Mike Banks Valentine

// -- NEW DISCUSSION -- //

"Super Snooper" ~ Mike Banks Valentine

// -- CONTINUING DISCUSSION -- //

"Ubiquitous Computing and Privacy" ~ Mike Banks Valentine

"Spam and Privacy" ~ Mike Banks Valentine

"Privacy Issues Weighty Ecommerce Concern" ~ Mike Banks Valentine

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// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

I'm very excited to have the honor of being chosen to moderate discussion on a topic I've been following with interest for over two years online and off. I expect to see some rather vehement and heated opinions voiced in this forum because I've watched otherwise level-headed discussions turn rather boistrous when privacy issues come up in conversations of internet industry marketing or security veterans.

An innocent comment on spam can cause unimaginable eruptions of heated emotions at a internet professional gathering. Vast hotel ballrooms overflow at web conferences to hear panel discussions on IT infrastructure security issues since September 11, 2001. Databases of customer information have been fought over in dot com bankruptcies while accidental exposures of private information is unwittingly made public by simple human error handling email soft- ware. Privacy issues made DoubleClick famous overnight.

I watched two episodes of the popular network television show "Law and Order" just this month that dealt with innocent death due to a hacker killing diabetics in one show and a stalker accessing private information purchased from datamining profiteers to kill an innocent in another show. Privacy issues have made it to Prime Time on 60 Minutes repeatedly, from identity theft to facial re- cognition software to airport security matters.

I expect no shortage of topics and know how easy it is to fan the flame if it flickers on this touchy matter. It's gonna be a blast!

I'll start things off with a couple of my own articles on Privacy with a capital "P" and taunt you with a touchy subject before we wrap up with a recent Privacy poll by Harris Interactive.

Your Moderator, Mike Banks Valentine

// -- NEW DISCUSSION -- //

===> TOPIC: SUPER SNOOPER

Super Snooper by Mike Banks Valentine

You've heard enough about Big Brother to last a lifetime, so I've renamed him Super Snooper to spare you the cliche during this discussion.

Super Snooper, (Big Brother), is using terrorism as an excuse to spy on everyone, scan their irises, print their fingers, record their movements and assign threat levels to each and every one of us. The latest announcement from the airline industry tells us of the testing of a huge new database full of facial recognition files, credit card activity records, airline seating charts, travel histories, driver licenses, social security numbers, bank records, employment records and any other "relevant" information they might deem necessary in efforts to track terrorists.

The computer all this information is stored on is capable of noting who you sit near on the plane and if you know anyone else on the passenger list. It knows if you've been sleeping. It knows if you're awake. It knows if you've been bad or good. So be good for goodness sakes! Super Snooper knows all-in the name of security and safety. I hope everything it knows is, not only true, but unfailingly correct in the conclusions drawn from everything stored in those really deep data piles.

Snooper sniffs the slightest whiff of smelly actions and, using predictive behavior models, assigns a threat level to you and me and dear old Auntie Mabel. Well, that's O.K. with me! It's all in our best interest, right? Security and safety are more important than protecting privacy, right? Right?!

Lest you think I'm exaggerating, hop over to the Washington Post story from January 31, at the link below and review it for yourself.

<http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A5185-2002Jan31.html">

It's not just terrorism that is putting security in the news headlines and privacy on the backburner. Last month Microsoft announced the appointment of a new Security Czar who takes the helm as their top privacy protector on April Fools Day. Scott Charney is a former Department of Justice Cybercrime cop who calls the top security job at Microsoft, "Irresistable."

That characterization of his new job is no doubt due to the horrible security breaches built into Microsoft's products and he relishes the challenge of plugging all those many gaping holes while seeking reassurance of the public and developers being urged to adopt the Net passport platform.

For my part, I wish him well and hope he succeeds on a grand scale since security of Microsoft products is critical if they gain even the smallest adoption of the .Net Passport system that requires registration of all MSN products users - as it is built in to the latest iteration of Windows, Explorer, Outlook Express and required of each of the MSN web services such as hotmail, bCentral small business services and each of their web portals.

I predict, without hesitation, that individual privacy and enterprise network security will be the blockbuster issues of computing and the web in the coming year. Super Snooper is, like it or not, going to be snooping and sniffing you, your grandmother, your kids, your neighbor, your friends, your enemies and all our biometrics to compare all that information to profiles of known terrorists. I know, I know, you're very harmless and sweet and innocent and honest and true.

It's those bad guys I'm worried about, so you don't mind if we profile you, right? We won't attach any of that information to your Net Passport, your medical records or your tax files. We won't sniff and snoop YOUR private information and add it to the database -- unless of course we find a reason to do so.

Really! We promise! Super Snooper is only after terrorists. Nobody is interested in all that information we have on you. Bet'cha it's totally secure too (on Microsoft IIS server soft- ware that is completely patched and impervious to hackers or criminals or even that cybergeek who lives next door.) I know that because Microsoft has a new Security Czar who starts his irresistable job on April Fools Day!

// -- CONTINUING DISCUSSION -- //

===> TOPIC: UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING AND PRIVACY

Even though I'm new to privacy discussion list moderation, I've been discussing those concerns for two years with web-centric colleagues and writing articles in online publications. Here's an article I wrote discussing tiny technology and the potential effect on privacy to watch for with the advent of ubiquitous computing.

Honey, I Shrunk the Chip! Gulliver Meets Big Brother http://www.website101.com/arch/archive122.html

~ Mike

===> TOPIC: SPAM AND PRIVACY?

Anyone ready to wade into Spam & Privacy? It always comes up. Introduce yourself and wade in, the water's really hot!

Comment? mailto:privacy@website101.com

===> TOPIC: PRIVACY ISSUES WEIGHTY ECOMMERCE CONCERN.

Privacy has been a growing topic of concern among the US public since 11 September. Harris found that 91% of US consumers say they would be more likely to do business with a company that verified its privacy practices with a third party.

<http://www.emarketer.com/estatnews/estats/ecommerce_b2c/20020222_harris.html>

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PRIVACYnotes Moderator: Mike Banks Valentine

Mike Banks Valentine is a champion of the true small online business. He advocates a do-it-yourself approach to e-commerce through online learning for the small office, home office (SOHO) or emerging entrepreneur who lacks major venture capital funding or corporate marketing budgets.

Mike is the founder of WebSite101, an educational resource for small businesses creating initial Web presences. His writing has appeared in international publications and his work praised by Entrepreneur Magazine. He does small business web marketing and search engine optimization.

Contact Mike Banks Valentine

 

 

privacy@website101.com 5318 E. 2nd St. #789 Long Beach, CA 90803