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PRIVACYnotes Discussion List
Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

Respecting Privacy on the Web

---------------------------------------------------------------------- PRIVACYnotes Digest Protecting Privacy is Good for Business ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Published by: Mike Banks Valentine website101 privacy@website101.com www.website101.com ---------------------------------------------------------------------- May 23, 2002 Issue # 011 ---------------------------------------------------------------------- .....IN THIS DIGEST.....

// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

"Email Appending" ~ Mike Valentine

// -- NEW DISCUSSION -- //

"DMCA and Privacy" ~ Anonymous

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

"The Latest in Privacy Issues"

----------------------------------------------------------------------

// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

"Psssst! Hey buddy, check dis out over heeya. If ya give me yer database of customas' offline info, I'll give you email addresses to match! Waddaya say pal? $2 per name, awright?"

That's how it might go down in a dark alley in privacy advocates' nightmare, but the reality is that the email appending industry uses bright chirpy banter and photos of clean-cut staffers to tell you the story. The following link will take you to the site of a vendor who explains email appending with Sunday-school innocence.

http://www.accudata.com/s_selfpromotion/email_append.html

Email appending is big business. Here's how it works. A multinational corporation wants to send out an email campaign to it's database of offline customers, say those who purchased their computer printer and filled out the warranty card and mailed it in. The problem? They don't have the email addresses of those customers. Who ya gonna call? Here, let's visit my favorite search engine, Google, and type "email appending" into the search box. Click submit.

There are results 1 - 10 of about 42,300. Search took 0.05 seconds. So much for exhaustive research. Well I suppose that if you wanted to drag things out a bit you could do a few price comparisons. The industry is huge and profitable.

So you want email addresses? Zip us an Excel spreadsheet of your customers names, addresses and phone numbers and we'll send back email addresses to match those customers with. What we won't tell you is that we are missing a good deal of that information ourselves and you'll be paying us to incorporate YOUR information into our email database. If you pay us enough, we'll even tell you about those customers lives, their taste in cars, their travel habits and their income levels. And . . . that's not all, if you can provide us with information on their computer system and software purchases, we'll throw in a free recap of their credit history -- No Charge!

DoubleClick was publicly reamed for announcing they would do this by merging the database of a direct marketing company they acquired with their own database of email addresses and the surfing habits of online users. They were sued, they lost millions, they were vilified in the press. Hmmmm. Why don't we care that 42,300 others are doing the same thing?

I wonder how much they'd charge to remove my information from all those databases? I don't think I could afford to buy back my privacy. The Direct Marketing Association (DMA) has introduced guidelines on the practice. A marketing industry analyst comments in a linked opinion piece below in news links. What do you think of the email appending industry?

~ Mike Banks Valentine

// -- NEW DISCUSSION -- //

===> TOPIC: THE DMCA AND PRIVACY

From: Anonymous

The entertainment industry, busy with the DMCA and trying to protect their "rights" to control our listening and viewing habits, has now decided that our personal video recorders should be monitored as well.

Industry Groups Rally Behind SONICblue - InternetNews DC http://dc.internet.com/news/article/0,1934,2101_1135561,00.html

The erosion of our rights continues.

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

Moderator note: There are two ways to access previously listed privacy news stories. One is to visit PRIVACYnotes archives, the other (simpler) way is to visit

http://privacynotes.com/privacy_news.html where I also keep a privacy news archive.

Researchers in Scotland are developing a new kind of Web monitoring software that they claim can collect enormous amounts of data on Web surfers while remaining nearly undetectable. The University of Strathclyde received the award for an undisclosed sum Thursday. Dr. Lykourgos Petropoulakis, who is heading the 18-month research project, declined to comment on the technology, calling it "highly classified" information. Web surveillance software has drawn intense interest from consumer advocates, who fear the interactive nature of the Internet can provide unprecedented power for governments, corporations and individuals to trample people's privacy.

<http://techupdate.zdnet.com/techupdate/stories/main/0,14179,2865194,00.html>

The agency responsible for the U.S. Defense Department's global networks and classified command and control systems has a gaping security hole in its front yard -- security cameras at its headquarters in Arlington, Va., are connected to a nonsecure and unencrypted wireless LAN. Chris O'Ferrell, chief technology officer at NETSEC Inc. in Herndon, Va., which provides intrusion-detection services to numerous federal agencies and commercial customers, detected the nonsecure wireless LAN at the Defense Information Systems Agency (DSIA) last Friday. While parked across the street from DISA's headquarters, O'Ferrell was able to easily map the topology of the agency's network, including the Service Set Identifier (SSID) numbers of access points and numerous IP addresses.

<http://www.computerworld.com/securitytopics/security/holes/story/0,10801,71231,00.html>

Ford Motor Credit informed 13,000 consumers Friday that their personal information -- including Social Security number, address, account number and payment history -- was accessed by hackers who broke into a database belonging to the Experian credit reporting agency. Federal Bureau of Investigation special agent Dawn Clenney told NewsFactor that the data breach is being investigated and that law enforcement is working with Ford, which believes the hack occurred sometime between April 2001 and February 2002. Letters to the 13,000 people, 400 of whom were Ford credit customers, were mailed out in the last three weeks. Privacy advocates, who point to identity theft's ascent as the top crime in the United States, called the exposure another example of insufficient privacy protection in the country.

http://www.ecommercetimes.com/perl/story/17826.html

A Senate committee appeared set on Thursday to pass a controversial measure that would limit the way businesses could use customers' personal information, until it was delayed by a parliamentary maneuver. The Senate Commerce Committee voted to approve several changes to the bill, designed to increase Internet privacy by limiting how businesses use phone numbers, purchase records and data collected through their Web sites. But a final vote to send the bill to the full Senate was blocked by Sen. Trent Lott, who invoked an obscure parliamentary rule that can prohibit a committee from taking action two hours after the Senate convenes.

<http://www.reuters.com/news_article.jhtml?type=technologynews&StoryID=972478>

Provisions of two new bills -- one to increase online "cybersecurity," the other to aid in the prosecution of online child pornography -- would remove statutory protections that safeguard personal data in the hands of Internet Service Providers (ISPs). Current law protects the privacy of electronic communications by prohibiting ISPs from disclosing to the government their customers' e-mail without a court order. The two new bills open loopholes in that protection by creating broad new categories of "voluntary" disclosure.

http://www.cdt.org/legislation/107th/wiretaps/

On May 16, the Senate Commerce Committee marked-up S. 2201, the Online Privacy Protection Act, introduced by Senator Ernest Hollings (D-SC). "Marking up" a bill means amending it in a formal Committee session where Members or Senators offer amendments, debate them and vote on them. Often at mark-up many amendments are rolled into a single "substitute" offered by the bill's sponsor. The Hollings bill as introduced, CDT's analysis of it, and the text of the amendments adopted on May 16 are all available at

http://www.cdt.org/legislation/107th/privacy/hollings.shtml

E-mail address appending is the process of adding an individualÕs e-mail address to that individual's record inside a marketerÕs existing database. This is accomplished by matching the marketerÕs database against a third party, permission-based database to produce a corresponding e-mail address. I was amazed that the organization (Direct Marketing Association) danced around privacy issues by creating a loophole extravaganza. The document was written by marketers for marketers, culminating in a classic case of a wolf in sheepÕs clothing. Opinion column by Rodney Much.

http://www.optinnews.com/news/showart.asp?DB=NewsTable&ID=1230


PRIVACYnotes Moderator: Mike Banks Valentine

Mike Banks Valentine is a champion of the true small online business. He advocates a do-it-yourself approach to e-commerce through online learning for the small office, home office (SOHO) or emerging entrepreneur who lacks major venture capital funding or corporate marketing budgets.

Mike is the founder of WebSite101, an educational resource for small businesses creating initial Web presences. His writing has appeared in international publications and his work praised by Entrepreneur Magazine. He does small business web marketing and search engine optimization.

Contact Mike Banks Valentine

 

 

privacy@website101.com 5318 E. 2nd St. #789 Long Beach, CA 90803