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PRIVACYnotes Discussion List
Security Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

Respecting Privacy on the Web

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PRIVACYnotes Digest
Security Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

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Published by: Mike Banks Valentine website101
privacy@website101.com www.website101.com
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June 27, 2002 Issue # 016
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.....IN THIS DIGEST.....

// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

"All About Legal Spying"

// -- NEW DISCUSSION -- //

"Privacy Fee?" ~ Eric Schwartzman

"Privacy Policy Company?" ~ David Hauser

"Web Mail & Privacy" ~ Rob Frankel

// -- CONTINUING DISCUSSION -- //

"Privacy Advocacy" ~ Eric Norlin ~ moderator comment

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

"The Latest in Privacy Issues"

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// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

Stunning openness for spying minds? I ran across this link to a British site that is designed for public and "Home Office" visitors in the United Kingdom. They discuss (in very limited manner) spying, surveillance and covert operations by English police, spy agencies and other "legal surveillance" professionals with an eye toward best practices! I guess it keeps the rules in view for the public and presents the appearance of open and honest communication about devious and underhanded techniques?

The following paragraph from the front page of "The Office of Surveillance Commissioners" or "OSC" lays bare the skeletal support of the rules from Big Brother in the land of Orwell.

"This website is primarily designed to be used by those who authorise and conduct covert surveillance operations and covert human intelligence sources (as informants and undercover officers are now known). It shows you how to carry out these activities in compliance with the powers granted by Parliament, and how the OSC monitors the exercise of those powers. By way of practical help we have identified some key points, some sources of advice, and some examples of good and bad practice."

http://www.surveillancecommissioners.org/

What do you think of a public forum for secretive activity? Should the US have an equivalent public site for oversight? Do you think this helps or hampers the spies? To good or bad effect? Very curious!

Mike Banks Valentine

 

// -- NEW DISCUSSION -- //

===> TOPIC: WEB MAIL & PRIVACY

From: Rob Frankel

I warn everyone that Hotmail, Yahoo and other web-mail accounts do incredible damage to your brand credibility. We've already seen how unethically Yahoo has behaved regarding your privacy when it ambushed your preferences. Now Hotmail is doing the same, which means more spam, less control of your e-mail:

Here's the latest:

About 2 months ago MSN added 2 little boxes in all the profiles. These boxes if marked share your email with other users. One box, if ticked, gives other people the right to see your information including your address.

Now MSN has taken all the passports that were created before they added this and marked YES SHARE MY INFORMATION and did not tell anyone.

HOW to remove sharing of email:

Sign into your email account (for those with more then 1 you have to do it for all of them),

1) click on OPTIONS 2) Click on PERSONAL PROFILE 3) Scroll to the bottom ... 4) You will see the TWO added boxes - remove the check marks and finish up.

One more reason NOT to use web mail.

Rob Frankel, "Yes, I really do turn users into evangelists for your brand."
Big Time Branding (SM) http://www.RobFrankel.com
Revenue-generating Branded Community (TM): http://www.i-legions.com
New series of e-books: http://www.RobFrankel.com/store

 

===> TOPIC: PRIVACY FEE?

From: Anonymous

According to tech consultancy Forrester Research, which published a report this week about online privacy, consumers would be willing to sacrifice their privacy for a fee. In a survey sampling 6,000 consumers, 36 percent of women said they would allow their web browsing to be tracked for a $5 a month discount from their Internet service provider. 33 Percent of men said they would also be willing to be tracked for a fee. Forrester said women are more likely to allow themselves to be tracked than men, since men are more likely to frequent porn sites.

New York Times reporter Bob Tedeschi wrote a technology brief about it in today's (May 14) business section (Page C4).

 

===> TOPIC: PRIVACY POLICY COMPANY?

From: Anonymous

Hello,

I was wondering if you or someone on the list had a suggestions for a person or company to help write a privacy policy for me?

// -- CONTINUING DISCUSSION -- //

===> TOPIC: Privacy Advocacy

From: Eric Norlin

Mike-

Having been involved in "privacy" from several angles (both in certain government agencies and as an editor at a personalization publication), I've been watching your list with great interest.

Today's issue leaves me a bit troubled (and perhaps I'm just nit-picking) -- if only because the definition of "privacy advocate" that you imply by your comments seems a bit limited.

The "privacy advocacy" that you seem to be implying (please correct me if I'm wrong) falls very much in the us vs. them (individual vs. the corp/gov) camp --- a position which i think, in the long run, doesn't truly serve anybody.

I'd much rather see the list talk about the ways in which business and government can work cooperatively with advocates to form initiatives, technologies and policies that are at once beneficial to biz/gov and respectful of the individual.

Furthermore, i think such a discussion would be advanced through much more precise language about privacy itself. To that end, I'd raise the specific topic of anonymity.....I've tried to write somewhat coherently about it here:

<http://www.digitalidworld.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=56>

I, for one, find privacy to become terribly boring terribly quickly when it is simply the Zoroastrian tale of standing up to the corp/gov. And studies show that, while most Americans will say they're deeply concerned, they will never actually *do* anything about it. Bottom line: privacy is an issue that advocacy groups and lists must work with the corp/gov on - and hardline stances probably just won't get anything done.

just my 2 cents....

Eric Norlin Senior Editor, Digital ID World www.digitalidworld.com

[ Moderator Comment: ]

You say:

"hardline stances probably just won't get anything done."

to which I must reply:

Blind trust leads to tripping over details in the dark.

Digital Identities and real world identities combine, inevitably, when that is possible. It is becoming more and more possible - and likely - daily.

Permit me a story.

Let's say I happen to know as your physician that your medical history points to a 7 in 10 chance that you will die before 50 of heart failure. At 49 you decide to run for President of the United States. Your health information is available digitally since HIPAA mandates that information be maintained digitally. Do I banish that portion of your medical digital identity if I support your election? What if I oppose your election and have that same information? Maybe public officials should be exempt from digital identity? Maybe this information should be entirely open and available to the public? Can John Q. Public become John Q. Private if he so chooses? Who decides that little detail?

Who has access and who controls and/or maintains that information?

I propose, at a minimum, that if digital identity is inevitable, that those health, financial and legal databases remain separated and protected from both public and private view - hence - privacy advocacy. Maybe here is where we can use competing systems to advantage, eh? Maybe Oracle for medical digital ID, IBM DB2 for financial digital ID and legal Digital ID to a Siebel product. Just so they can't talk with each other. ;-) Do you think all of this belongs in one central database? That is where we are headed.

Homeland Security may have access to your legal ID, Health and Human Services your medical ID and maybe Commerce your shopping ID. If the IRS maintains your Tax ID, would they then be able to communicate and share information with HHS when you don't pay your hospital bills? Are you then refused future healthcare, and, is your shopping ID then shared with your TAX ID?

Homeland Security is working now to combine disparate databases - BEFORE we discuss any of this. Isn't that a problem? You are correct that the purpose of the list is to discuss privacy. I thank you for bringing digital ID into the discussion.

Mike Banks Valentine

 

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

Moderator note: There are two ways to access previously listed privacy news stories. One is to visit PRIVACYnotes archives, the other (simpler) way is to visit

http://privacynotes.com/privacy_news.html where I also keep a privacy news archive.

The buzz around appending as an email marketing optimization tool has increased since E-mail Address Appending Best Practices for Marketers was released last month by the Association for Interactive Marketing's Council for Responsible E-mail (whew, that's a mouthful!). In fact, more than one vendor approached me at the ClickZ email conference last month, to ask me to recommend their appending services to my consulting clients. Here's the rub: I'm not a fan of appending.

http://www.clickz.com/em_mkt/opt/article.php/1367711

What You Need to Know About HIPAA Compliance! HIPAA - the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act - is a federal law developed, in part, to define and regulate the use of healthcare information in the United States. Entities that provide, pay for or supply health services, medications or equipment, as well as their business partners and vendors, are affected by this new set of regulations. This article summarizes the work that needs to be done to meet requirements necessary to become HIPAA compliant.

http://website101.com/Privacy/HIPAA_compliance_privacy.html

In a move aimed at ensuring mobile marketers have their say in the discussion about wireless privacy best practices, the Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) has joined non-profit seal organization TRUSTe in its efforts to establish guidelines for the new medium. The privacy organization, which gives its "seal of approval" to companies that abide by its guidelines, has been working on developing standards for the wireless world since February, when it signed on AT&T Wireless as its initial partner in the effort. The agreement with the MMA calls for the industry organization to get a seat on the TRUSTe Wireless Privacy Committee, and for TRUSTe to work with MMA member companies and include them in privacy initiatives.

http://www.ecommercetimes.com/perl/story/18337.html

Amid uncertainty about whether surveillance cameras should be used to control crowds, detect terrorists or scare off drug dealers, the authorities in the nation's capital are debating rules intended to keep them from becoming a tool of Big Brother spying on citizens. The Metropolitan Police Department has only 14 cameras in use, at places like the Old Post Office Building on Pennsylvania Avenue and the neighborhood of DuPont Circle, and officials insist they have no current plans to install more. But other institutions, like the school system and the metro, use cameras.

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/06/19/national/19PRIV.html


PRIVACYnotes Moderator: Mike Banks Valentine

Mike Banks Valentine is a champion of the true small online business. He advocates a do-it-yourself approach to e-commerce through online learning for the small office, home office (SOHO) or emerging entrepreneur who lacks major venture capital funding or corporate marketing budgets.

Mike is the founder of WebSite101, an educational resource for small businesses creating initial Web presences. His writing has appeared in international publications and his work praised by Entrepreneur Magazine. He does small business web marketing and search engine optimization.

Contact Mike Banks Valentine

 

 

privacy@website101.com 5318 E. 2nd St. #789 Long Beach, CA 90803