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HIPAA

PRIVACYnotes Discussion List
Security Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

Respecting Privacy on the Web

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Privacynotes Digest
Security Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

This Issue Is Brought To You By WAIM Shape our Future! http://www.waim.org/conferences.html

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Published by: Mike Banks Valentine Privacynotes privacy@privacynotes.com www.privacynotes.com
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September 5, 2002 Issue # 024
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2nd Annual Meeting for The World Association of Internet Marketing

Join your fellow internet marketers on September 18-19th to discuss our industry. Goals are to develop standards for the Internet Marketing industry, a code of conduct, and to establish relationships with relevant organizations. This year's theme is to establish "A Partnership between Internet Marketers and Search Engines".

Confirmed participants are: *Overture *MP3.Com *Espotting *ICANN *Open Directory *Friends Reunited *BT /LookSmart *Rugged Handheld *GoodJet.Com

.. and more to follow.

For information and booking, please visit http://www.waim.org/conferences.html

This year's location: Dynamic Earth, Edinburgh, Scotland

Join WAIM - Shape our Future!

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.....IN THIS DIGEST.....

// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

"HealthPrivacy Project Update" ~ Mike Banks Valentine

// --CONTINUING DISCUSSION -- //

"Snooping Eula" ~ Ian O'Neill

"Technical Malfunctions" ~ Bob Hoffman ~ Moderator Comment

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

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// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

==> TOPIC: HEALTHPRIVACY PROJECT UPDATE

Health Privacy and financial privacy [See financial privacy related news item at bottom] are two of the most hotly debated topics within the increasingly complex penumbra of a large privacy umbrella.

I'm taking the opportunity this week to post a notice just received from the Health Privacy Project of the Institute for Health Care Research and Policy in Washington. I highly recommend their "Health Privacy 101" PDF download library at:

http://www.healthprivacy.org/info-url_nocat2302/info-url_nocat.htm

Privacy issues online will only get more confusing and complicated as more aspects of our lives move online and become widely accessible to hackers through breaches in security, as well as through plain sloppiness and a poor understanding of the value and volatility of Personally Identifiable Information [PII].

Privacy breakdowns have affected huge swaths of the public through corporate slip-ups and plain ignorance.

It's great to have a watchdog group like the HealthPrivacy Project looking after our collective interests.

===> HealthPrivacy Project notice follows <===

Today, the Health Privacy Project released revised summaries of the health privacy statutes of seven states: Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island and South Dakota. In addition, the Pennsylvania summary has been updated to incorporate changes in copying costs for medical records.

The updated state summaries reflect changes in state health privacy statutes that have been made since our original report, The State of Health Privacy: An Uneven Terrain (A Comprehensive Survey of State Health Privacy Statutes), was published in 1999. The 1999 report will be available on the Project's Web site until October 1, 2002.

It is important to note that these are summaries of state statutes. In general, we did not research or include regulations or common law, both of which ultimately must be understood in order to appreciate the full range of protections at the state level. The summaries focus predominantly on the use and disclosure of information gathered and shared in the context of providing and paying for health care. Furthermore, we have not analyzed how these state laws will interact with the federal health privacy rule issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

We are extremely grateful to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for supporting this initiative.

The updated state summaries are available at the Health Privacy Project Web site at www.healthprivacy.org

 

// -- CONTINUING DISCUSSION -- //

===> TOPIC: SNOOPING EULA

From: Ian O'Neill

Lynn Bernstein said >> Has everyone seen the new EULA [END-USER LICENSE AGREEMENT] from Microsoft? <<

The increasing number of viruses on the Net and the escalating anxiety of software and content producers now precipitating more militant responses to the open and unrestricted nature of the Internet, it is very evident to me that my computer connection to the outside world is an important ‘personal frontier’, a relationship with the world at the heart of which lies some key issues pertaining to personal freedom. Sooner or later we will have to defend our right to own and manage our own computer memories and operating systems.

Ian O'Neill

 

===> TOPIC: TECHNICAL MALFUNCTIONS

From: Bob Hoffmann

Mike Valentine wrote: >> The hotel, in a resort area, likes to believe that EVERYONE that stays in their little burg wants to be out of touch with the world while there. <<

Yup, there are indeed establishments that cater to that mentality. It is your responsibility as the guest to investigate all "necessary" amenities. I've gone hiking into remote canyons for days at a time to escape all connection to the outside world--elsewhere, with the world is so connected, I couldn't consider it a vacation!

Web Coordinator, Information Department Cooperative Extension, Washington State University http://caheinfo.wsu.edu/webtips/

[ Moderator Comment ]: I know this thought will jar some less tech friendly list members, but I expect that with satellite access to the web, even remote wilderness areas will soon be web accessible and you'll find hikers with their PDA's and Video enabled Cell phones and Blackberry's accessing their office email, sending notes to client's and checking in on the kids while they are trekking through scenic backwoods.

Those intrepid souls would not be there in many cases if they could NOT do those things. All we need do is to disable the beeping so it doesn't disturb the peace of the wilderness and get loud, boisterous talkers to keep it quiet.

I want the choice to have that access everywhere I go and I believe there are increasing numbers of tech-sector professionals that would agree with me. I strongly believe that the great value in this proposition outweighs the need to escape those amenities.

Just as phones are now available everywhere, so too will web access be ubiquitous. I can't wait!

Mike Valentine

 

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

Moderator note: There are two ways to access previously listed privacy news stories. One is to visit Privacynotes archives, the other (simpler) way is to visit

http://privacynotes.com/privacy_news.html where I also keep a privacy news archive.

Bring out the ballot-initiative petitions. Financial privacy is going nowhere in California without direct voter action. You may live and vote in California, but the Legislature does not work for you. It works for all the financial institutions launching an apparently limitless supply of legislative torpedoes to sink privacy protections that Californians, like other Americans, overwhelmingly desire. State Sen. Jackie Speier, the San Mateo Democrat whose pro-privacy bill died in the last hours before the Legislature adjourned for the year Saturday, says she's going to try again next year. She shouldn't bother.

http://makeashorterlink.com/?N5CF21FA1

Eager to head off criticism from privacy advocates and users over the expanded surveillance provisions in its forthcoming National Strategy for Securing Cyberspace, the Bush administration is expected to recommend appointing a federal "privacy czar" to act as watchdog. Chief among the czar's duties would be to vet all government data gathering and security initiatives for potential privacy problems, according to a draft of the plan.

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,3959,503728,00.asp

Are privacy policy notifications on Web sites and via snail mail enough to solve the privacy problem? Or are these first steps raising even more questions and concerns for business partners, consumers, and employees? If you think your company has done its privacy duty just by posting its policies, you may be in for a rude awakening.

http://www.techweb.com/tech/security/20020828_security

privacy@website101.com 5318 E. 2nd St. #789 Long Beach, CA 90803