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HIPAA

PRIVACYnotes Discussion List
Security Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

Respecting Privacy on the Web

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Privacynotes Digest Protecting Privacy is Good for Business
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Published by: Mike Banks Valentine Privacynotes privacy@privacynotes.com www.privacynotes.com
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October 3, 2002 Issue # 028
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.....IN THIS DIGEST.....

// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

"Privacy in Public" ~ Mike Banks Valentine

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

"The Latest in Privacy Issues"

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// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

==> TOPIC: PRIVACY IN PUBLIC

Do Americans have a right of privacy while in public places?

Last week an Indiana woman was arrested for beating her child in view of a surveillance camera in a public parking lot. [See linked news story in the privacy news section below.]

This event raised concerns of privacy advocates about the ever present electronic eyes trained on us from every angle in public spaces. Business owners place cameras with the intention of diverting crime by monitoring their property and recording activities in parking lots, stock rooms and even fitting rooms at clothing stores.

What are appropriate limits? Do we have a right to expect that our public travels go unrecorded?

 

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

Moderator note: There are two ways to access previously listed privacy news stories. One is to visit Privacynotes archives, the other (simpler) way is to visit

http://privacynotes.com/privacy_news.html where I also keep a privacy news archive.

The Justice Department has accused the nation's super-secret wiretap court of improperly trying to "micromanage" the workings of the executive branch. In new court papers, the department also said it was entitled to expanded powers to conduct wiretaps and other surveillance of people suspected of terrorism or espionage. Attorney General John Ashcroft made the arguments earlier this week in seeking to overturn a ruling last May by the secret tribunal, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which is responsible for reviewing wiretap requests in terrorism and espionage cases. In that ruling, the court unanimously rejected a request from the Bush administration to break down many of the procedural barriers between criminal prosecutors at the Justice Department and counterintelligence agents at the F.B.I.

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/09/28/national/28WIRE.html

A new Web site displaying color photographs, market values and other property data for every home and business in Nassau County is proving to be extremely popular and equally unpopular. Critics are demanding that the site be censored or even shut down. Calling it an invasion of privacy, they cite fears that the information it contains could be misused by gossips, burglars, stalkers, kidnappers, rapists and murderers. Curious electronic visitors have downloaded millions of pages since Sept. 9, when Nassau put the data online to show the owners of 400,000 properties the results of the first countywide reassessment since 1938.

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/09/27/nyregion/27NASS.html

"Surveillance cameras?" asked Donnette Carter of the Porterville Chamber of Commerce. "Offhand, I couldn't tell you." With the recent arrest of a woman in Indiana whom a security camera videotaped beating her daughter in a parking lot, the presence of electronic eyes across America has drawn new attention. But what security and privacy specialists have long known might surprise people in towns like this: the surveillance equipment is everywhere, not just in big cities and at obvious places like Times Square or outside the White House, but also in Porterville and Mishawaka, Ind., and hundreds of other places. More often than not, private rather than public hands are controlling the lenses, as was the case in Indiana.

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/09/29/technology/29TAPE.html

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