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HIPAA

PRIVACYnotes Discussion List
Security Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

Respecting Privacy on the Web

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Published by: Mike Banks Valentine Privacynotes
privacy@privacynotes.com www.privacynotes.com
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October 24, 2002 Issue # 031
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.....IN THIS DIGEST.....

// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

"Privacy News Resources" ~ Mike Banks Valentine

// -- CONTINUING DISCUSSION -- //

"Privacy in Public" ~ Moderator comment

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

"The Latest in Privacy Issues"

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// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

Two weeks ago I attended the Digital ID World Conference in Denver. Last week I promised an article reviewing that show. This weekend I found myself blocked from access to my server as I attempted to FTP files through an AOL connection. I'm told that the issue is Proxy Servers that won't allow many types of file transfers through that AOL connection. Long story short: I'm waaay behind in my work! The article is put off briefly until I catch up.

Does anyone know of solutions to remote access to FTP connections while on the road? I'm currently spending weekends away from my trusted DSL line and find the usually handy-while-traveling-AOL a handicap. Maybe an 802.11b card for my laptop and a few hours at a Starbucks location? Any advice appreciated off-list.

On topic, though, I have some good news about news sources! Last week we had an anonymous post that asked:

>> Please do not link to The NY Times. They require you to register, a surrender of privacy! There are many other publications that can stimulate without registration. <<

In response to that request, I went searching for additional resources of Privacy news and hit the Jackpot! I have regularly referred to the Electronic Privacy Information Center newsletter [EPIC Alert current issue at http://www.epic.org/alert/EPIC_Alert_9.19.html ] as an excellent resource, but had been relying heavily on the New York Times clip service to send Privacy news updates simply because they provided fairly extensive coverage of privacy matters on a regular basis and because I am already a member of their daily email alerts titled "TODAY'S HEADLINES."

I had been posting a warning line after each NYTimes news story link that registration was required and advising a review of their privacy policy before signing up, but dropped that practice at some point. I will resume that warning notice as of this issue and my new sources will offer other places to get your privacy news, thanks to the nudge from our anonymous list member last week.

The best resource comes from the Privacy Council, publisher of a paid privacy newsletter titled, Privacy Weekly, available for $295 yearly at http://privacyweekly.com/ . Many of us have become accustomed to free information online and the price for free is usually giving up a small piece of your privacy by offering a simple username and password as registration information. But if you want wide-ranging and serious news for the Privacy Professional, I highly recommend this publication to add to your "must read" list.

Here's the table of contents from the current Privacy Weekly

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Brought to you by Privacy Council Powered by Genius Publishing
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NEWS INDEX --------------------------------------

  1. Data Security - e-Commerce Companies Fight Fraud
  2. Enforcement & Violations - FTC Investigates Privacy Policies of Pharmacy Chains
  3. Insights - What Makes a Good CPO? [Chief Privacy Officer]
  4. Government - States Want Tough Online Privacy Rules
  5. HIPAA - College Football Injury Reports Could Disappear
  6. HIPAA - Critics Say Patient Privacy Is at Risk
  7. Personal Privacy - Identity Theft Update
  8. Indiana / Government - No-Call Law Earns Money
  9. Government - How Effective Is Privacy Protection in Your State
  10. Personal Privacy / Technology - Technology Tracks Your Moves
  11. Personal Privacy / Spam - New Technology Targets Spam
  12. Data Security - Microsoft Warns about New Bugs
  13. Numbers - High Anxiety Online
  14. Events - New & Noteworthy Events

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Now for those of you seeking a free resource, I happen to have a great NEW place to find your privacy news. It requires a bit of use to understand and a bit of tweaking to use effectively, but can provide a gold mine of information if you are willing to work it.

http://newsseer.com is a news search engine that is customizable and adjustable to your personal interests through a rating system and the use of cookies at the site. [Can't escape cookies if you want it free!]

Newsseer.com is very impressive in it's ability to deliver relevant news to your inbox and you can request a daily, weekly or monthly digest of your chosen news topic[s] mailed to your inbox on your chosen schedule!

I welcome any additional suggestions for privacy news resources and hope these prove valuable to readers!

 

// -- CONTINUING DISCUSSION -- //

==> TOPIC: PRIVACY IN PUBLIC PLACES

From: Your Moderator

Last week we had an anonymous post in which the following statement was included:

>> For those who are interested in retaining a vestige of privacy, we are fighting a losing battle. Our lives are an open book; we are numbered, branded, headlined and recorded, both by private and business concerns; if we do try to remain private, we are accused of having something to hide! <<

To this I'll respond with a David Letterman-esque . . . So?

While I agree with our very private subscriber's statement and lament the loss of privacy brought on by technology, it is beginning to appear unlikely that anything can be done, as hard as we might try. I encourage everyone to read the linked opinion piece By David Holtzman below in the Privacy News section on a fantasy proposal for "Indications and Warning" system recommended for Terrorism prevention - which, as of now, seems absurd to consider.

 

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

Moderator note: There are two ways to access previously listed privacy news stories. One is to visit Privacynotes archives, the other (simpler) way is to visit

http://privacynotes.com/privacy_news.html where I also keep a privacy news archive.

Many people say the intelligence agencies should have known about Sept. 11 before it happened. Some go further and contend the intelligence bureaucracy should always know in advance when something is going to happen. Analysts call this predictive capability an "Indications and Warning" system, although no one has ever come close to building anything this broad in scope. Some might also say that's a laughable idea. But as a former intelligence analyst and information retrieval expert, I thought it might be interesting to spec one out for you. You never know until you try, right? Connect existing government and commercial databases.

http://news.com.com/2010-1071-962828.html [Opinion Piece]

Anti-terror laws raise net privacy fears Powers to stop terrorists could be abused by Police warn experts. Powers to scrutinise records of online activities granted to UK law enforcement agencies to tackle terrorism in the wake of September's attacks could undermine online privacy, warn net experts.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/1647309.stm

Internet merchants, weary of a near constant barrage of credit card fraud that costs them more than $1 billion each year, are joining forces in hopes of helping one another identify users of stolen credit cards, catch criminals and perhaps soothe the fears of millions of potential online shoppers. A group of the Web's biggest e-commerce companies, tentatively called the Internet Merchant Fraud Roundtable, has formed over the last year, with the goal of creating a database that merchants could use to block potentially fraudulent transactions and help snare people who commit credit card fraud. The group hopes to have the database set up by the first half of next year. "We're trying to construct a neighborhood watch," said George Redenbaugh, the manager of risk management and customer privacy at Hewlett-Packard, and one of the organizers of the round table. "It may turn out to be something we can't pull off, to be quite candid with you, but we're trying to work this out."

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/10/21/technology/21ECOM.html Registration required, read and understand the NYTimes privacy policy!

California and Minnesota protect the privacy of their citizens better than any other states, while the federal government does a poor job, a study by Privacy Journal says. Robert Ellis Smith, publisher of the monthly journal, said the two states have much in common in the commitment to privacy rights, though he ranked California marginally ahead."Both have a permanent office in state government looking after privacy," he said. "Both state supreme courts have reaffirmed the right to privacy." "In California, the court has ruled that constitutional protections for privacy apply to private as well as government actions," he said. The state government also has a privacy office, and its Legislature is continually "tweaking" privacy laws to stay on top of new intrusions.

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/10/20/national/20PRIV.html Registration required, read and understand the NYTimes privacy policy!

The recent European Union-sponsored Data Protection Conference on privacy heard reports from businesses, media outlets, trade unions and four EU nations that demonstrated why the United States should not follow Europe's pro-regulation path in protecting Internet privacy. Protecting privacy is important, but information exchange is also a necessary part of a thriving economy and a properly functioning democracy. The lesson that U.S. lawmakers should take from the EU's experience is that overly strict data regulations will waste resources, reduce commerce and suppress freedom of speech while providing few true privacy gains. Instead, the U.S. should continue to allow consumers to decide their own level of privacy protection by using privacy-protecting technologies and by voting with their wallets. That is the best path to privacy solutions.

http://news.com.com/2010-1069-962993.html

Legal pressure from a coalition of 12 states has forced popular Internet retailer Amazon.com to change its privacy policies, though privacy advocates argue that the changes don't go far enough. Amazon has agreed to be more explicit in what data it collects from customers and how that data is used. Also, the company will not sell its 23 million- name customer database directly to marketers, will provide heightened protection for consumer data collected, and will significantly narrow the wording of exceptions in its current privacy statement.

http://makeashorterlink.com/?T21D21B22

In Rhode Island, battered women, stranded sailors, lost hikers and others in need of emergency help can dial 911 from a Sprint, Verizon or T-Mobile cell phone and authorities will automatically know where they are, thanks to Global Positioning System technology embedded in their phones. The only statewide e911 system in the country still has kinks to work out, but officials expect Cingular, AT&T and Nextel phones to be connected by the end of the year. It's one of many developments that experts and analysts are studying closely as location tracking becomes the latest business opportunity and battleground for privacy advocates.

http://www.siliconvalley.com/mld/siliconvalley/4305025.htm

Consumers Face Tricky Maze in Guarding Privacy. Businesses, responding to lawmakers and consumers, say they are giving customers more ways than ever to control how their personal information is used and sold. But, in fact, many companies all but frustrate their customers' attempts to exercise that control. Barbara Bechtold of Sacramento recounts the unending process of trying to keep companies from selling her e-mail address and the details of her credit card accounts, insurance policies and mortgage inquiries.When she tried to tell Pacific Bell not to share information that some phone companies sell, including calling habits, she found herself confronted with a voice automation system maze. "Push `1' for this, push `2' for this," she recalled. "Twenty different steps to say, `I don't want you to sell my information, please.' "

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/10/17/business/17PRIV.html Registration required, read and understand the NYTimes privacy policy!

 

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