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HIPAA

PRIVACYnotes Discussion List
Security Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

Respecting Privacy on the Web

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Privacynotes Digest
Security Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

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Published by: Mike Banks Valentine Privacynotes
privacy@privacynotes.com www.privacynotes.com
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January 23, 2003 Final Issue
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.....IN THIS DIGEST.....

// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

Goodbyes

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

"The Latest in Privacy Issues"

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// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

I've enjoyed my stint immensely and hope to continue close monitoring of Privacy issues, as I've always done, but will publish occasional articles here at the PrivacyNotes site in the future instead. I invite subscribers to stay in touch.

Farewell and keep informed, first by reading this week's Privacy news links below!

Mike Banks Valentine

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

Moderator note: There are two ways to access previously listed privacy news stories. One is to visit Privacynotes archives, the other (simpler) way is to visit

http://privacynotes.com/privacy_news.html where I also keep a privacy news archive.

Senator Russ Feingold is introducing legislation that would stop U.S. government data-mining activities directed at U.S. citizens pending Congressional authorization. The bill targets the controversial Total Information Awareness (TIA) program of the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Senator Ron Wyden introduced yesterday an amendment to an omnibus spending bill that would suspend funding for TIA pending Congressional review. Nine organizations, including the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), ACLU, the Electronic Privacy Information Center, the Center for Democracy and Technology, and the Free Congress Foundation, sent a letter opposing TIA to the leaders of the House Armed Services Committee on Tuesday.

http://www.eff.org/Privacy/TIA/20030115_pr.php

RSA Security Inc. is developing an online identity management technology that, for the first time, puts the control of personal data in the hands of users. The technology, known as Nightingale, is set to be unveiled at the RSA Conference in San Francisco in April. With the system, users would store their personally identifiable information on their local PC, likely in encrypted form, and grant access to it on a site-by-site basis, according to company officials. Users would then be able to give each site access to a subset of their data, appropriate for whatever transaction they're looking to conduct.

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,3959,837722,00.asp

If you're thinking of becoming a customer of Royal Bank of Canada, be prepared to have your name cross-checked against a massive database of money launderers, criminals and other suspicious individuals. Canada's largest bank has quietly invested in a private U.S. database firm created last year to conduct in-depth background checks on new and existing financial clients. It's all part of a sector-wide effort to crack down on fraud and comply with post-9/11 anti-terrorism regulations, such as the U.S.A. Patriot Act. Privacy advocates say the irony is that RDC aggregates public information to create a private database that the public can't access. And with this public information, RDC creates reports for its clients that the public may not be allowed to check for inaccuracies.

http://makeashorterlink.com/?W20216723

As the tools of warfare generally outstrip the ability of medical technology, so, too, has our ability to destroy privacy exceeded the protections offered by the Constitution and the political short-sightedness of Congress. And it is in the power, and is therefore the ethical responsibility, of the IT community to slow or even stop some of the worst excesses planned by Attorney General John Ashcroft. It's also imperative that IT make its case for privacy to our elected officials. Several initiatives are currently in the works to stop the federal government's equally odious Total Information Awareness program, and there should be more. Don't be one of the people who helped make George Orwell's "1984" a reality in 2003.

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,3959,835408,00.asp

Reflecting increased alarm about a Pentagon plan to find terrorists by trolling the electronic records of all Americans, several senators took steps Thursday to rein in the project and halt other ``data mining'' efforts until Congress can review the implications on civil liberties. Sens. Dianne Feinstein, Daniel Inouye, D-Hawaii, and Ron Wyden, D-Ore., drafted an amendment Thursday night to the $390 billion federal spending bill now being considered by Congress to temporary stop the Pentagon's Total Information Awareness project.

http://www.siliconvalley.com/mld/siliconvalley/4969039.htm

The Growth of an American Surveillance Society." This report grew out of our sense here at the ACLU that in order to make progress on the privacy issue, we have to shift the terms of the debate. When viewed in isolation, many new privacy invasions seem harmless to many Americans, who don't see why they should care that (for example) someone is recording the date and time that they drive through a tollbooth. To understand the privacy issue one has to look at the big picture to understand that each new piece of information collected about us, no matter how seemingly harmless, is increasingly being added together with thousands of other data points to create an extremely intrusive, high-resolution picture of our lives.

http://www.aclu.org/Privacy/Privacy.cfm?ID=11573&c=39

E-Loan's CEO is defying his industry, putting $1 million of his own money into trying to qualify a privacy-protection initiative for the California ballot. Chris Larsen thinks banks, credit card companies and other financial services firms are shortsighted when they fight efforts to strengthen protection of consumers' personal financial information. In general, Larsen doesn't think much of the financial services industry at all, predicting that technology will eventually turn it into a dinosaur. So perhaps it should be no surprise that Larsen, who happens to head an Internet-based lending company, is defying his own industry by pumping $1 million of his own money into a proposed initiative for 2004 aimed at increasing consumer control over their data.

http://makeashorterlink.com/?J16426C13

SHOPPERS may want to think twice before indulging in another carton of ice cream. The shopping cart might give them away.At two California stores, in Moraga and Cameron Park, the Safeway grocery chain is testing a cart that uses infrared tracking to learn more about people's buying habits. Infrared sensors on the cart and elsewhere in the store keep a record of customer movement, even how long they linger in each aisle. "If you're in the produce section, or the deli or frozen foods, it knows where you are," said Brian Dowling, a Safeway spokesman. Customers can swipe their Safeway club card through a box mounted on the cart, which quickly consults a database of recent purchases, Mr. Dowling said. He added that customers liked the system because it offered savings tailored to their needs.

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/01/16/technology/circuits/16safe.html

"If you're going to the cleaners, the P.D.A. will know when you're getting close and can send a signal to let them know you'll be pulling up so they can get your shirts," he said. "If you're going home, it can automatically turn on the heat when you're a mile away from the door." But he acknowledges that this type of convenience comes with a potentially significant trade-off: information about people's everyday movements can be very valuable. "Our company is starting to get noticed, and after people looking for jobs, the greatest number of calls we get are from people who want to buy our data," Mr. Holzman said. "But that's not our business. We don't store the data about where people go, and we don't sell it."

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/01/16/technology/circuits/16loca.html

http://www.darpa.mil/iao/iaotia.pdf

 

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