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HIPAA

PRIVACYnotes Discussion List
Security Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

Respecting Privacy on the Web

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PRIVACYnotes Digest
Security Protecting Privacy is Good for Business
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Published by: Mike Banks Valentine
privacy@privacynotes.com www.privacynotes.com
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April 11, 2002 Issue # 005
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.....IN THIS DIGEST.....

// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

"Data Warehousing Worries?" ~ Mike Banks Valentine

// -- NEW DISCUSSION -- //

"Terrorism Transformative" ~ anonymous

// -- CONTINUING DISCUSSION -- //

"YAHOO! Yanks Privacy" ~ anonymous

"Who Reads Privacy Policies?" ~ anonymous

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

"The Latest in Privacy Issues"

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// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

The airlines are instituting vast data-mining and predictive behavior modeling software in an attempt to alert them to potential terrorists. This is, of course, a laudable goal. The major problem is that it means they must collect and analyze that data for all of the flying public in order to sort of figure out what terrorist activity might look like.

CRM software being implemented by online businesses is meant to do a very different thing in tracking, analyzing and predicting buying behavior, return on investment, lifetime value of customers and other marketing and sales information. What does preferred customer behavior look like?

Facial recognition software coupled with closed circuit television cameras videotaping our every move must collect and analyze more, very different information and law enforcement agencies are increasingly beginning to share that information across local, state and federal boundaries.

Now the scary issue is when someone finds a way to connect all the dots and bring those databases together and share information across all those differing lines of interest. Databases of mined information from vast data warehouses can suddenly be linked together via the web and soon everyone can be tracked across their web activity, buying habits, public travels and law enforcement connections and we have big brother happening in that linking of databases and data warehousing.

Microsoft .Net Passport anyone?

It's inevitable that this is coming. What we do about it and how much of this data linking we allow is going to be very important, very soon.

Also, 'tis a big week for privacy news and commentary. The articles are truly very interesting and I encourage everyone to look at the linked stories as I'm sure they'll each fire some discourse.

~ Mike Banks Valentine

// -- NEW DISCUSSION -- //

===> TOPIC: TERRORISM TRANSFORMATIVE?

"Privacy interests will yield to national security interests. Moreover, I'm afraid that I think that they should. It seems to me that what occurred on Sept. 11 was a transformative act in our history. While people are trying to go back to life as it was before Sept. 11, I don't think it's possible. I think it's likely that we will have another attack, which will be very damaging to us, and I think that after that second attack there will be more incursions into privacy. And I think that I, among others, will say that it is a necessary price to pay."

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/07/magazine/07QUESTIONS.html

[ Moderator Comment ]: Mr. Abrams is not a member of this discussion list, but no doubt would have some valuable input. The above comment was drawn from an April 7 Interview with the New York Times Magazine.

// -- CONTINUING DISCUSSION -- //

===> TOPIC: YAHOO! YANKS PRIVACY!

From: anonymous

I too went to Yahoo when I got the so-called privacy notice, and found that they had signed me up for more than a dozen marketing emails. This, at the same time they are applying filters to route emails they think are spam into a dustbin.

Interesting, huh? They are blocking their competitors, and secretly opting us into their own spam.

anonymous

===> TOPIC: WHO READS PRIVACY POLICIES?

From: anonymous

anonymous wrote: >> I find I never read privacy policies because if I don't already trust the company to be reasonable with my personal contact info, I don't believe anything written in their privacy policy either. <<

I agree. And further more Mike added : >> It seems that even major players can go from trusted to UMMM . . . not trusted, in a single sweeping flourish. <<

I agree with that too. My choice? I make up information. It's none of their business. Perhaps if there were enough people entering info such as Mickey Mouse or whatever, and people understood the value of the information, perhaps things may change. How much money is my information worth to a company? How much do I receive?

anonymous

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

Now that HTML e-mail has become increasingly common, cookies are showing up in HTML e-mail messages, many of which are sent by spammers, who have little or no obligation to disclose how they use consumer data they collect. Whereas cookies on Web sites generally collect data "anonymously," e-mail cookies have the potential to connect individuals' surfing habits with particular e-mail addresses.

http://news.com.com/2100-1023-875992.html

A three-judge panel hearing a case against the Children's Internet Protection Act were openly skeptical of the law at the end of the two-week trial. The plaintiffs, including libraries, library patrons, and operators of Web sites, want to overturn the law because it mandates Internet filters that the group says restrict free speech. The judges seem to agree.

http://www.wired.com/news/politics/0,1283,51591,00.html

Most passwords are hopelessly easy to guess and many employees put company information at risk by using easily guessed or simple to break passwords. Very few employees are ever trained in rudimentary security measures which puts networks at peril.

<http://www.cnn.com/2002/TECH/internet/04/08/passwords.survey/index.h tml>

DoubleClick settlement details begin to slowly emerge from the shadows after last week's announcement of the class action suit against privacy protection advocates. The online advertising company has agreed to pay $1.8 million in legal fees and will purge their list of names on a regular basis.

http://zdnet.com.com/2100-1105-871837.html

YAHOO! flames flying after they opt-in users to spam last week. Because word travels fast online, even users who have not yet been notified by YAHOO! are angry about the changes to their privacy preferences, even though YAHOO! claims that no changes take effect for 60 days from the day the user is notified of the change.

http://zdnet.com.com/2100-1106-871803.html

Corporate hack attacks go unreported to law enforcement or federal authorities due to concerns of public exposure of privacy and security problems at those companies suffering attacks.

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/08/technology/08BREA.html

Ezine-Tips discusses problems with BBB privacy seal and third party list hosts. Web sites approved by BBB online are required to place the seal on every page, including that of list hosts. If those hosts don't allow posting of the BBB seal for members, then those list owners cannot get the BBB privacy seal at all.

http://ezine-tips.com/articles/management/20020328.shtml

As the number of wireless devices in use continues to grow, security concerns regarding them are mounting as well. New market research reports from Gartner and IDC suggest that corporate users and consumers have reason to question how much information they could be giving away through their wireless devices.

http://www.pcmag.com/article/0,2997,s=1490&a=25005,00.asp

International Business Machines Corp. (IBM) said on Wednesday it is releasing free software that will allow companies to automate their Internet privacy practices, while AT&T Corp. T.N has free software to alert Web surfers to different privacy settings on Web sites.

http://reuters.com/news_article.jhtml?type=search&StoryID=773438

A poll taken just after the six-month anniversary of the September 11th attacks on New York's World Trade Center and the Pentagon showed that Americans' support for and confidence in electronic governmental surveillance is waning.

http://www.ecommercetimes.com/perl/story/17111.html

http://www.newsfactor.com/perl/story/17029.html

Informix spin-off Ascential Software Inc. last week said it's buying privately held data-cleansing software vendor Vality Technology Inc. for about $92 million in cash. The deal, slated to close in April, would let Ascential (ASCL-Nasdaq) expand its tool suite for building data warehouses.

http://www.informationweek.com/story/IWK20020315S0024 http://www.informationweek.com/story/IWK20020312S0085

 

 

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