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HIPAA

PRIVACYnotes Discussion List
Security Protecting Privacy is Good for Business

Respecting Privacy on the Web

---------------------------------------------------------------------- PRIVACYnotes Digest Security Protecting Privacy is Good for Business ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Published by: Mike Banks Valentine PrivacyNotes privacy@privacynotes.com www.privacynotes.com ---------------------------------------------------------------------- May 9, 2002 Issue # 009 ---------------------------------------------------------------------- SEND POSTS: mailto:privacy@privacynotes.com ----------------------------------------------------------------------

.....IN THIS DIGEST.....


// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

"Privacy Central Issue" ~ Mike Valentine

// -- NEW DISCUSSION -- //

"Privacy Humor" ~ Future Feed Forward ~ Moderator comment

// -- CONTINUING DISCUSSION -- //

"Digital ID" ~ InternetWeek

"Digital Databases" ~ Anonymous ~ ZDnet ~ Moderator comment

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

"The Latest in Privacy Issues"

----------------------------------------------------------------------

// -- MODERATOR COMMENT -- //

PRIVACY CENTRAL ISSUE?

This week I stumbled across a letter to the editor in the New York Times which opposes the establishment of a National ID, essentially in the form of a U.S. drivers license. This idea hatched as a sort of "Back Door" to a national ID, both because states were already looking at ways to make DL's uniform, and because Larry Ellison so generously offered Oracle database software to make that giant National ID database a reality. (For the record, that's said "generously" tongue-in-cheek.)

The thing that startled me was the signatures on that letter to the editor. I'll reproduce below, the concluding line of that letter and it's signers. Be prepared to be a bit startled yourself!

"A national identity card would diminish privacy in America and do nothing to prevent further acts of terrorism on our soil." PHYLLIS SCHLAFLY NADINE STROSSEN Washington, May 1, 2002

The writers are the presidents of, respectively, the Eagle Forum and the American Civil Liberties Union.

Is it possible that we've found an issue we can agree on from both the left and the right? Is privacy such a central issue that Americans of every political stripe can stand together truly united on this critical issue?

Well I found out, after doing a bit more research, that a broad spectrum of organizations have all come together to support the fight against a National ID/Driver License system. For a list of signatories of a letter to President Bush and the full text of the letter. Visit the following URL:

<http://www.epic.org/privacy/id_cards/presidentltr2.11.02.html>

On the same day in the same newspaper as the letter to the editor was a column by William Safire angrily opposing another privacy intrusion being called "Observational Research". (Link to column in news links.)

"Finally, libertarians of left and right should hold President Bush to his pledge to require merchants to ask the consumer's consent. How would he like to have "observational research" in the Oval Office?"

One nation, indivisible. With privacy and security for all? What do you think of that?!

~ Mike Banks Valentine

 

// -- NEW DISCUSSION -- //

"PRIVACY HUMOR"

From: Future Feed Forward

Wireless Designer Labels Help Chic Shoppers Show Off

MILAN--In a bid to both attract technologically savvy clients and combat the scourge of high-fashion knock-offs, a special research committee of the Joint Council for Fashion and Design announced Wednesday the final draft an open standard for the wireless authentication of designer garments. "The standard has been a longtime in development," notes Greta Weif, Chair of the Council's steering committee. "And we are very pleased with the results. The system will, at last, bring the technology of fashion awareness into the 21st century."

Responding to the Authus announcement, privacy experts sounded notes of concern. "We are justifiably concerned about how this system is going to be used," worries First Privacy founder Willamette Quan. "Beyond the nightmare possibilities of 'fashion police' devices looking for 'knock offs' is the subtler, but deeper, threat the system poses to the anonymity that is crucial to equality in public spaces. Do we really want to live in a world where everybody walks around with a dollar figure over their heads?"

"Fashion is about publicity, not privacy," responds Prada spokesman Michael Adams-Green-Bury. "Our clothes make a complex social statement, and the [Authus] labels are part of that statement. Our clients choose us because they have something to say. Our job is to help them say it."

Read the entire hilarious column at:

http://futurefeedforward.com/front.php?fid=79

[ Moderator Comment: ]

I'm a smiling subscriber to this great techno-humor site and their semi-regular email companion. I highly recommend FFF for web professionals who yearn for intelligently substantive lighthearted commentary. Privacy puns are a regular feature.

Mike Banks Valentine

 

// -- CONTINUING DISCUSSION -- //

===> TOPIC: DIGITAL ID

From: InternetWeek

Internet Identity Poll

What role will efforts to build public identity platforms such as Microsoft Passport or the Liberty Alliance play in your enterprise's authentication and single-sign-on strategies?

*These public services will be very important to our internal efforts.

*These services will be peripheral to our enterprise efforts, but we will consider enterprise-class systems based on their protocols/mechanisms.

*These are consumer-oriented services and of no interest to our enterprise.

*Too early to tell; it remains to be seen.

Weigh in with your opinion at the following URL

http://www.internetweek.com/question02/question042502.htm

 

===> TOPIC: DIGITAL DATABASES

From: Anonymous

Will Bontrager commented : >> That wouldn't make life tougher for terrorists, it would make it *easier* <<

on my comment: >> What was left unsaid was that will also make life tougher for every single person, not just terrorists. All of us equally. <<

Sorry Will, I think I may not have been clear enough. I meant tougher for all of us in the loss of privacy. Tougher for all of us as it would be much simpler for any one person or entity to obtain more information about a person because it's stored all in one place.

It seems companies cannot even keep their present information private, as shown by various companies allowing (however unintentionally) others to have access online, or the information stolen.

I think until we can keep private information private, it ought to stay scattered.

 

Late one recent Sunday night, an executive at a midsized financial services firm received the kind of call everyone in the industry dreads: a demand for $1 million, or else the brokerage's network would crash the next day with a surreptitiously installed program.

<http://techupdate.zdnet.com/techupdate/stories/main/0,14179,2863266,00.html>

[ Moderator Comment: ]

This frightening TRUE story clearly indicates good reason for the concern expressed by both Willmaster and Lynn Bernstein. Anyone remember the story last month of Bank of America "losing" records of all deposits made one recent Friday? They don't provide the public with details to protect their image as safe places for money. How long before you lose your savings or simply your financial data?

 

// -- PRIVACY NEWS -- //

Moderator note: There are two ways to access previously listed privacy news stories. One is to visit PRIVACYnotes archives, the other (simpler) way is to visit

http://privacynotes.com/privacy_news.html where I also keep a privacy news archive.

San Francisco Chronicle Opinion on privacy legislation. AN UNACCEPTABLY weak financial-privacy bill reaches a critical juncture Tuesday in the state Assembly's Judiciary Committee. This is the moment for sponsoring Assemblyman Joe Nation, D-San Rafael, to deliver on his promise to produce truly meaningful consumer protections in AB1775. It may require Nation to break his alliance with Gov. Gray Davis, who undermined a strong privacy bill last year -- and appears determined to do so again.

<http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/chronicle/archive/2002

Homeland Security Director Tom Ridge for the first time disclosed Thursday the Bush administration is studying ways to set national standards for driver's licenses that would assist in preventing fraudulent identification and expose aliens who overstayed their visas.

http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=02052002-072009-4333r

Once the musings of science fiction writers and technology whiz kids, the promise of fingerprints and retinas opening some doors -- and keeping others locked -- has been rushed into reality. Companies around the world are perfecting ways to scan, store and process faces, fingers, voices, hands and eyeballs. The Sept. 11 attacks spurred a mini boom in security products and services, and scuttled some of the privacy and civil liberties concerns that long hampered the industry.

<http://www.Reuters.com/news_article.jhtml?type=technologynews&StoryI >

"We've been ordered to invade the privacy of our customers,'' said Ken Potashner, SonicBlue's chairman and chief executive. ''This is something that we find personally very troubling.'' Privacy advocates condemned the ruling which came during the pre-trial discovery process of a series of lawsuits against SonicBlue. Last October, the studios and networks accused SonicBlue of permitting copyright-infringement with its latest digital video recorder. The machines work like a VCR but record to a hard drive instead of video tape.

http://www.siliconvalley.com/mld/siliconvalley/3186191.htm

As wireless laptops, scanners and other gadgets become more popular in businesses and homes, threats to privacy are growing as well. Just this week, Best Buy suspended use of wireless cash registers over concerns that eavesdroppers could obtain credit card numbers and other customer data by sitting in the parking lot with the right equipment.

http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/business/technology/3185545.htm

Federal authorities announced a nationwide sweep of identity theft arrests today, charging the people with using false credentials to cover up a murder, sell homes belonging to the elderly and exercise 176,000 stock options belonging to an unknowing company executive. Attorney General John Ashcroft announced the prosecutions, many of them fraud cases, to demonstrate sharply stepped-up federal efforts, and he called on Congress to pass legislation to ensure that identity thieves received longer sentences

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/05/03/national/03IDEN.html (Free membership required, Read the Privacy Policy!)

Intrusion Explosion. Forget all about old-fashioned consumer surveys or even focus groups. The hot new technique in exploring your buying decision is called "observational research" or "retail ethnography." This buying-spying uses hidden surveillance cameras, two-way mirrors and microphones concealed under counters. Opinion from William Safire.

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/05/02/opinion/02SAFI.html (Free membership required, Read the Privacy Policy!)

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